Coastal Style

A Reclaimed Wood House Rises In the Trees

When property taxation in central Austin started sinking from the lush Bouldin Creek area, designer Christina Campbell of Confluence Studios decided to do it. She split her up whole lot, sold her home and used the money to design a brand new treetop house in her previous backyard.

She took the chance to create a house that is budget environmentally friendly and environmentally conscious. She bought a lot of the wood from ReStore, a building materials outlet benefiting Habitat for Humanity. What’s more, Campbell’s house adheres to aspects of ecological psychology, with personal personal locations and a deep link to the leafy landscape.

“Nature doesn’t have a great deal of right angles,” Campbell says. “The shape of the home, for me, establishes spaces that foster creativity, inspiration, relaxation and link with surrounding nature.”

in a Glance
Who lives here:
Christina Campbell and her son, Jasper Herman
Location: Bouldin Creek area of Austin
Size: 1,250 square feet; 2 bedrooms, 2 baths

Sarah Natsumi Moore

The roof takes advantage of the flow of rainfall. To conserve space and improve the efficacy of the rainwater system, the house rises 15 feet directly over a rain cistern on four big cement pylon stilts. The railing around the home is antique metal found from Campbell’s architecture warehouse.

Sarah Natsumi Moore

Reclaimed siding shapes the overall aesthetic. For the siding, Campbell moved to her local lumber store and discovered a pile of walnut with a gray patina that was ruined by rain. “Adapting ugly siding was me wanting to utilize wood with character that wasn’t too costly and not in the tree’s expense,” Campbell says. She hired a subcontractor to complete and protect the wood via a traditional Japanese system known as yakisugi-ita. The blatantly singed surface appears different from every angle, with beautiful striations that wrap around the curved outside.

Sarah Natsumi Moore

“I grew up in a home with high ceilings and a great deal of light, which is very important to me,” Campbell says. 2 porthole windows flank the centre sliding doors that let in lots of Austin sun. Campbell hung an oversize Union Jack to shade the home during the day. The high ceilings that make up half of the living area soar to 25 feet.

Sarah Natsumi Moore

“Good lights can be hard to come by as a consumer,” Campbell says. Mercury glass X-ray pendant shades over the countertop with their reflective insides add an exceptionally high quality quality of light. A glulam beam in the timber store, a less expensive alternative to butcher block, constitutes the rocky countertops.

Sarah Natsumi Moore

For kitchen cabinets, Campbell repurposed her grandma’s kitchen hutches and a caisson from her grandparents’ farm. In Campbell’s words, “eliminated the demand for much more forest creation, which, needless to say, would also have a great deal less character.”

Campbell cut off the top two of the naturally distressed pieces and used them to tie the look together — one turned into a hinged door to conceal cleaning supplies under the sink and the other became kitchen island end caps.

Sarah Natsumi Moore

Campbell discovered the various reclaimed wood planks used on the kitchen island and beams at a local lumber mill. Instead of painting it over, she left the wood as is to show the character of each piece. The immaculate 1960s barstools have been a lucky garage sale find.

The spiral staircase is from a WWII submarine. “I highly recommend spiral stairs since they are great space savers,” she states.

Sarah Natsumi Moore

The majority of the contemporary decor pieces, such as the table lamp, are out of Campbell’s favorite style store in Austin, Nannie Inez. “I like the notion that both the contemporary and antique pieces will be my son’s heirlooms someday,” she states. Campbell’s grandmother painted the garden artwork.

Sarah Natsumi Moore

After years of conducting design and architectural companies, Campbell has accumulated a surplus of excellent pieces, but she wanted a more minimalist inside in her home. “The title of my game became ‘allocated jumble,'” she says. She purchased the metallic and leather trunks in a Neiman Marcus warehouse selling a decade ago for 90 percent away. They now exhibit travel photos and mementos.

Chair and Chair: Nannie Inez

Sarah Natsumi Moore

In one of the baths, a Victorian baby tub from Campbell’s Confluence warehouse reminds her of one of the grandma’s homes in New Orleans. “Leaving the plumbing exposed seemed to dovetail nicely as it sits atop an industrial gas bin,” she states.

Sarah Natsumi Moore

Campbell discovered this oversized copper bathtub on Craigslist. She discovered that the green tile in a wholesale marble stone yard where employees cut out custom layouts. It took a long time for the tile and the stone employees to keep slowly trimming off until the joints were perfect. The plan is her homage to the aesthetic De Stijl movement of the 1920s.

Sarah Natsumi Moore

The curved wood particulars on the front doors mirror the curvature of the roof over. “The soft curves provide an organic flow that imparts a feeling of simplicity,” Campbell says.

Future strategies to get her house are now focused outdoors. After volunteering at Food is Free, Campbell was inspired to grow her own vegetable farm in her front yard. She has also sketched out big origami-like abstract sculptures with solar panels to be placed in front of her home.

Windows and doors: Soco Window and Door, Austin

Sarah Natsumi Moore

Campbell’s writing/drafting porch constructed inside the thick green canopy out her bedroom doorway highlights her style solution to ecological psychology — to have a personal space to regulate one’s emotions and a feeling of connection to nature.

Sarah Natsumi Moore

To reach her goal, Campbell needed to operate much slower than she is used to. “It took me a year and a half, which doesn’t match my personal demand for expediency,” she states. “But frankly, if it moved any faster, achieving thriftiness and a exceptional appearance and the green viability aspect would have been sacrificed.”

Show us your creative house

Read more homes by design:
Little Homes | Colorful Homes | Eclectic Homes | Modern Homes | Contemporary Homes
Midcentury Homes | Ranch Homes | Conventional Homes | Barn Homes
Townhouses | Apartments | Lofts | Vacation Homes

See related

Tags :